Is Your Team Thinking Like A Starbucks Team?

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Dear Christian Radio,

Is Your Team Thinking Like A Starbucks Team?

YOUR FIRST FEW DAYS ON THE JOB? YOU HAD A FRESH EXCITEMENT.  YOU HAD A PASSION FOR THE NEW JOURNEY AHEAD. YOU WERE PROBABLY THINKING, “I’M HAPPY FOR THIS NEW CHAPTER IN MY LIFE AND THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT ABOUND. I’M NO LONGER EMPLOYED AT [XYZ COMPANY] AND TODAY IS A NEW DAY.” EVEN THROUGH THE ENDLESS HR PAPERWORK, YOU WERE PATIENT, WILLING TO LEARN AS MUCH AS YOU CAN, AND EAGER TO MAKE SURE YOU WERE CREATING HARMONY WITH YOUR NEW COLLEAGUES.

Now fast-forward to where you are today. Even after Vision Week revivals or after a high moment of a successful project completion, do you still have the same passion level as your first day?

Why is this important?

Passion is Contagious.

Your passion level is important because listeners, donors, clients, and even co-workers can sniff it out. The world around us is affected by our attitude towards our work. Think about the Starbucks barista: if their attitude was “meh” or “so-so” about their product, what taste would that leave in your mouth (pun intended)? If your attitude is rushed or “I’m so over this” about your task, project, or department, that will spread like a virus throughout the building and even out to listeners.

Secondly, if you head up a project or department, and your passion is 100% — the contagiousness of that passion is likely to be received less than 100%. Let me explain: A production director has just produced a spot. She has lived with the nuances of that production from Step 1 until completion. She has cut and re-cut the VO, modified the script, edited for time, chosen the music bed and tweaked, and tweaked, and tweaked … to make it perfect. She knows ALL that is in that production. She is excited and plays it for a team member who happens to walk by. “Hey, listen to this! What do you think?” They listen together. The production director is beaming, eagerly waiting for a response. The team member likes it and responds, “Hey, that’s great! Sounds really professional and fun. Wow. Great job!”

And then walks away.

What’s the point here?

The production director’s passion for the spot is at a much higher level than probably anyone else in the building for that particular project. She may listen to the finished product 3 or 4 times in a row to relish her job well done. Even though she got a positive and encouraging compliment, the team member is headed to his next project and, understandably, is not as excited about the spot.

It’s natural; there’s nothing wrong with the way this works; nobody did anything wrong in the above scenario. But, the lessen here is passion is transferred in proportional doses.

Realizing that you need a crazy high passion level even for just a fraction of it to rub off on someone else is key in transforming the culture of awesomeness around these walls!

If Starbucks team members are crazy-nuts about even the farming of the coffee bean, how much more will that transfer to your experience of walking in and enjoying a simple cup of coffee?

Dear Christian Radio,

1. Accept that your passion level will be higher than most, especially when related to your pet project or expertise

2. Know that, like the old days of dubbing cassette tapes – the master recording is always crisper than any dub or subsequent copy – such is the passion of those around you.

3. Work on ways to maintain your passion in order to help raise the levels of those around you; and do not being discouraged if they never fully “arrive.”

Daniel Britt

VP of Culture Integration

Positive Alternative Radio

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